Guest Column by Jeff Golden, February 16 2020

Since the Legislature reconvened on Feb. 3, I’ve heard hundreds of Oregonians — at rallies, in committee hearings, in Capitol hallways — make their case on Senate Bill 1530, the revamped cap-and-invest bill to slash greenhouse gas emissions. After years of working on this issue, I notice these conversations bringing me back to the understated heart of this battle. It’s fairness.

That became clear in the testimony of a well-dressed older woman from Portland to a Senate committee last Saturday. She was troubled by comments of earlier witnesses — loggers, ranchers and other rural Oregonians who’d told us that rising costs from this bill would devastate their towns and businesses. That, she said, is just selfish. “What matters most is our children and the planet,” she said. “To solve this huge problem, we all have to sacrifice.”

More

Andrew Selesky, AP February 8th 2020 Appeared in Medford Mail Tribune, February 9th

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — So many people flocked to the Oregon State Capitol to testify Saturday at a public hearing on a climate change bill that the allotted time for each to speak was reduced to 90 seconds.

As a large screen in Hearing Room C showed the seconds ticking off, loggers expressed concern that the bill would lead to increased costs and the demise of their business. Others, taking turns at occupying three seats before the Senate Committee On Environment and Natural Resources, said global warming was an emergency that was already affecting them and would affect their children and grandchildren even worse.

“Rather than passing the buck, and demanding that the rest of the nation and world take care of us, we have a moral obligation to address our emissions,” Alan Journet, who lives in Jacksonville, a town of 2,700 in southern Oregon, said in written testimony on behalf of 1,500 rural Oregonians who are members of a group called Southern Oregon Climate Action Now.

More

It’s no secret that fossil fuel companies have cast doubt on climate science for decades. What’s more, it should be no surprise that they’ve spent billions lobbying against any serious regulation of their emissions.

Alan Journet interviewed by Dave Miller on the OPB ‘Think Out Loud’ program on January 31st 2020 about SOCAN’s ‘Master Climate Protector – A Primer for Action.’

The nonprofit group Southern Oregon Climate Action Now has certified over 30 people to be Master Climate Protectors. The class is modeled on the Master Gardener program, and teaches participants the science behind climate change.  Alan Journet is a former biology teacher, and the co-facilitator of Southern Oregon Climate Action Now.

Listen Here

Guest Column By Louise Shawkat, Assland Daily Tidings, February 3rd 2020

The wheels on the bus go round and round …

And for whom do they rotate?

In 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat. Parks has become the catalyst for Transit Equity Day. We can participate in Transit Equity Day at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 4, in the Ashland Public Library in a program sponsored by Southern Oregon Climate Action Now’s Ashland Action team.

At least 100 million people drive to work; 27 minutes is their average one-way commute. Meanwhile, only 7 million of us use public transit.

More

How our reefs are under threat and what we can do about it

Why are our Coral Reefs at risk?

 

Coral reefs are one of the most important ecosystems on the planet. While they cover only .1% of the ocean floor, these rainforests of the sea are home to a quarter of all marine life. Thousands of species of fish, along with iconic octopi, sea turtles, sharks, and millions of other organisms,  depend upon coral reefs for their survival.

But what role do Coral Reefs play?

Coral reefs act as an essential food source, providing key nutrients and proteins for one billion people around the world, protecting coastlines from erosion, storm surges, and enhancing tourism economies.

Also, even marine life that do not feed on the coral directly, depend on it to sustain their prey, thus providing a fundamental part in supporting the ocean’s ecosystem.

However, coral reefs are currently facing a dire crisis. Recent studies have revealed that 50% of the world’s coral reefs have already been destroyed, and another 40% could be lost over the next 30 years.

So why is this happening and how can we stop it?

More

Tony Boom, Medford Mail Tribune, January 1st 2020

Ro Lewis parked her hybrid car at TC Chevy to get a charge and walked up to the Jackson County Fuel Committee site on Valley View Road near Ashland to help load firewood. The actions were part of her efforts as a Certified Master Climate Protector to combat climate change.

Lewis gained the certification by taking the Master Climate Protector course offered by Southern Oregon Climate Action Now and completing a service requirement. The group’s 2020 course will begin Feb. 10. Four previous classes have produced 59 climate protectors, with 22 of them going on to complete 20 hours of service to gain certification.

More

A newly unearthed journal from 1966 shows the coal industry, like the oil industry, was long aware of the threat of climate change.

Élan Young, 11/22/2019 HuffPost

“Exxon knew.” Thanks to the work of activists and journalists, those two words have rocked the politics of climate change in recent years, as investigations revealed the extent to which giants like Exxon Mobil and Shell were aware of the danger of rising greenhouse gas emissions even as they undermined the work of scientists.

But the coal industry knew, too — as early as 1966, a newly unearthed journal shows.

More

Tony Boom, Ashland Daily Tidings, January 24 2020

Ro Lewis parked her hybrid car at TC Chevy to get a charge and walked up to the Jackson County Fuel Committee site on Valley View Road near Ashland to help load firewood. The actions were part of her efforts as a Certified Master Climate Protector to combat climate change.

Lewis gained the certification by taking the Master Climate Protector course offered by Southern Oregon Climate Action Now and completing a service requirement. The group’s 2020 course will begin Feb. 10. Four previous classes have produced 59 climate protectors, with 22 of them going on to complete 20 hours of service to gain certification.

More

Foods differ vastly in terms of the quantity of land, water, and energy needed per unit of energy and protein ultimately consumed, and in terms of their greenhouse gas impacts (see chart). Although the data in the protein scorecard, and in the chart, are global means for current agricultural production—masking variations among locations, production systems, and farm management practices—they enable general comparisons across food types.

Unlike many other studies, the comparison of food types in the protein scorecard and the chart incorporates both land used for pasture and greenhouse gas emissions associated with changes in land use, using the GlobAgri-WRR model.

More