Residential End Uses of Water, Version 2: Executive Report

Single-family homes typically use the most water of any utility customer sector. The 23 utilities studied show a decline of 22 percent in average annual indoor household water use since WRF’s landmark 1999 study. Water providers should consider lower household water use when making future plans.

Introduction:

It is essential for water providers and the urban water supply industry to have a detailed understanding of how water is used in residential settings. While water use in homes was studied as early as the 1940s, interest intensified after the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which sought to improve energy and water efficiency. This Act established maximum flow rates for new residential toilets, showerheads, and faucets. Later federal regulations included clothes washers. Water efficiency in homes has also been encouraged by programs like EPA’s WaterSense.

Until now, the most significant residential end use study conducted in North America was the Water Research Foundation’s 1999 report, Residential End Uses of Water (REU1999) (Mayer et al. 1999). WRF’s new report, Residential End Uses of Water, Version 2 (REU2016) (DeOreo et al. 2016), provides an updated and expanded assessment of water use. It includes more varied study site locations, hot water usage data, more detailed landscape analysis, and additional water rate analysis.

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Oregon 2023 Legislative Session

Southern Oregon Climate Action Now has annually followed bills introduced to the Oregon Legislature that relate to climate.  This year, some 4,000 proposals are  expected.  We are currently exploring those that have been filed to date and deciding which to promote and which to oppose.

Many of us will be following bills and giving testimony on those we wish to see passed or rejected.  The best way to keep track of bills is via the Oregon Legislative Information System (OLIS). For a brief introduction to OLIS visit What’s an OLIS?

For tips on contributing oral and written testimony visit Testimony Tips.

SOCAN’s Legislative Priorities are under development and will be available when determined.

Rising temperatures bring an increased risk of wildfire.

January 24th 2023, Ashland.news

January 24, 2023

Weekly classes will be held from 6-9 p.m. Mondays starting Feb. 6 in Medford

Southern Oregon Climate Action Now will offer a 10-week comprehensive course on climate change and its societal effects, according to a news release.

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Newsroom Staff, January 11th 2023

Master Climate Protector website with Registration Information

MEDFORD, Ore. – Southern Oregon Climate Action Now (SOCAN) is offering a ten-week course that aims to provide residents of Southern Oregon with an understanding of the critical elements of the climate crisis.

SOCAN said the course will cover topics such as the basic science behind climate change, alternative explanations for the warming trend, energy, transportation, agriculture, health, population, consumption, climate justice, and actions that can be taken to address the crisis.

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Alan Journet gave remote testimony via ZOOM to the Oregon Investment Council

Divest Oregon has been promoting efforts to persuade the Oregon Treasury to divest funds from fossil fuels.  In the 2023 session, HB2601, the Treasury Investment and Climate Protection Act has been introduced.  SOCAN has been involved in the movement since before the 2022 session and will be testifying in support whenever possible..

On January 25th, on behalf of SOCAN, Alan Journet offered oral testimony to the Oregon Investment Council, which advises the Treasurer on investment policies for funds in the state Treasury.  The focus of the testimony was in support of HB2601 that encourages divestment of state funds from fossil fuels.  Because the facility where the OIC met did not provide ready remote access, Divest Oregon co-leader

The team testifying on HB 2601 to the Oregon Investment Council

Sue Palmiter provided Alan with a ZOOM link.  Sue then carried her computer to the podium and allowed testimony via her computer and the in-house microphone.  Apparently the council members heard it.

Alan’s oral testimony follows, the written testimony is below.

HB2601 Oral Testimony to OIC

Chair Samples and members of the Oregon Investment Council:

Thank you for allowing me to comment remotely from Southern Oregon. I testify as cofacilitator of Southern Oregon Climate Action Now, an organization of over 2,000 Southern Oregonians and friends who are concerned about the climate crisis and wish to encourage statewide action to address it. For over ten years, we have been engaged with the statewide climate coalition and sympathetic legislators who share our concern and interest in establishing state programs that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote carbon sequestration in natural and working lands.

We have been encouraged by agency responses to Governor Brown’s Executive Order 20-04 and the passage of bills that move the state forward in doing our part to address this existential global crisis. We are, however, aware of one glaring loophole in the state’s effort. That loophole, it will not surprise you to hear, is in the investment of Oregon Treasury funds. Over several election cycles, none more so than 2022, Oregonians have demonstrated endorsement of efforts by the legislature and state agencies to address the climate crisis. It is only reasonable to conclude that a majority of Oregonians would prefer that their tax and retirement investments do not undermine the state’s overall effort to address the climate crisis. Those of us in rural Oregon consider ourselves to be on the frontline of the climate crisis with increasing drought and associated wildfire risk. We think that state funds should not be invested in activities that increase our risk. Rather, we feel strongly that these funds should be invested in activities that counter the root cause of these threats. We urge an immediate moratorium on new public and private investments in carbon-intensive entities.

To those who argue that divesting from fossil fuel may compromise fiduciary responsibility, I note that my wife and I have personally chosen to invest in a fossil fuel free portfolio as has Southern Oregon Climate Action Now.  Those claiming that divesting will threaten financial return simply have not assessed the veracity of the claim; it is another unfortunate and obscure form of climate science denial!

Addressing the climate crisis is urgent; our children, grand-children, and all life forms on the planet urge our immediate action.

On behalf of SOCAN, I urge you to consider favorably the principles embodied in HB2601 and support the bill.

Thank you!

—————————————————————————————–

The written testimony previously submitted follows:


Alan R.P. Journet Ph.D.
Cofacilitator
Southern Oregon Climate Action Now
alan@ssocan.eco
541-500-2331
January 17th 2022

 

 

Oregon Investment Council

Chair Samples and members of the Oregon Investment Council:

I write as cofacilitator of Southern Oregon Climate Action Now, an organization of over 2000 Southern Oregonians and friends who are concerned about the climate crisis and wish to encourage statewide action to address it. For over ten years, we have been engaged with the statewide climate coalition and sympathetic legislators who share our concern and interest in establishing state programs that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote carbon sequestration in natural and working lands. I write today in connection with HB2601, The Treasury Investment and Climate Protection Act.

Climate concerned Oregonians throughout the state have been encouraged by agency responses to Governor Brown’s Executive Order 20-04 and the passage of bills in previous legislative sessions that move the state forward in doing our part to address this existential global crisis. We are, however, aware of one glaring loophole in the state’ effort. That loophole, it will not surprise you to read, is in the investment of Oregon Treasury funds. Over several election cycles, none more so than 2022, Oregonians have demonstrated endorsement of efforts by the legislature and state agencies to address the climate crisis. It is only reasonable, therefore, to conclude that a majority of Oregonians would prefer that their tax and retirement investments do not undermine the state’s overall effort to address the climate crisis. Those of us in rural Oregon consider ourselves to be on the frontline of the climate crisis with increasing drought and associated wildfire risk. We think that state funds should not be invested in activities that increase our risk. Rather, we feel strongly that these funds should be invested in activities that counter the root cause of these threats.

As a result of these concerns, we urge closing this glaring loophole in Treasury investments. The steps we urge are:

  • An immediate moratorium on new public and private investments in carbon-intensive entities as indicated below;
  • Withdrawal within six months of all publicly traded state funds from carbon-intensive investments using as a criterion the Carbon Underground 200 list;
  • Withdrawal within two years of investments in major fossil fuel (coal, oil and natural gas) producers and developers using the Global Oil & Gas Exit List (GOGEL) and Global Coal Exit List (GCEL);
  • Withdrawal by 2035 from all private investments that are carbon intensive;
  • Develop a plan for investments of state funds that reflects climate resilient principles and promotes social justice;
  • Develop a plan that allows public scrutiny of the investment behavior of the Treasury with respect to public funds.

On behalf of SOCAN, I further urge you to consider favorably the principles embodied in HB2601 and support the bill.

Respectfully Submitted

Alan Journet

Testimony to the Joint Ways and Means Committee on General Government….

Climate Action Begins at Home

Alan Journet, Cofacilitator Southern Oregon Climate Action Now
January 2023

While it’s clear that solving the urgent climate crisis requires substantial collective governmental effort at all levels, from the local to the federal, it is also very much the case that climate action starts with what we as individuals and families do. This is a critical first step because

  1. although solving the climate crisis is a daunting task, it starts at home where the cumulative impact of millions of painless choices can be immense, and
  2. while collective governmental action undoubtedly can have a greater effect than individual action, those of us aware of the problem, it’s causes and remedies, will have no authority or credibility in urging friends, co-workers, family members, and candidates or elected representatives to take action unless we are doing all that we can to address the crisis ourselves.

What’s the Climate Crisis?

In a nutshell, Figure 1 depicts the problem:

More – Climate Action Begins at Home

Alan Journet, January 2023

Over recent years many well-intentioned individuals have proposed that nuclear power generation must be included as an essential component of any effort to address the climate crisis.

The argument seems to be founded on three premises:

  • Clean renewable energy sources are inadequate to provide our energy needs.
  • Nuclear energy generation is free of greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Nuclear energy is safe.

In developing position statements on an array of issues relating to the climate crisis, the SOCAN Board, in December 2021 adopted a position statement on the potential role of nuclear power generation.

By way of background justifying this position statement, the following explanation was developed: The-Nuclear-Conundrum.

Seth Borenstein, Associated Press January 12, 2023

DENVER (AP) — Earth’s fever persisted last year, not quite spiking to a record high but still in the top five or six warmest on record, government agencies reported Thursday.

But expect record-shattering hot years soon, likely in the next couple years because of “relentless” climate change from the burning of coal, oil and gas, U.S. government scientists said.

Despite a La Nina, a cooling of the equatorial Pacific that slightly reduces global average temperatures, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration calculates 2022’s global average temperature was 58.55 degrees (14.76 degrees Celsius), ranking sixth hottest on record. NOAA doesn’t include the polar regions because of data concerns, but soon will.

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LTE by Kayla Mauriello, Medford Tribune, December 15th 2022

Reap the benefits of solar power without installing panels on your home!

Powering your home’s electricity with clean renewable solar energy seems ideal, but for folks whose homes won’t support solar panels or who rent their homes like me, solar seems like a no-go. That’s where community solar comes in.

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Meteor Blades, Daily Kos, December 13, 2022

Just over half the Republicans in the Senate and House who take the oath of office in three weeks have expressed views in opposition to what the overwhelming majority of scientists tell us is happening with Earth’s climate. In the House, there are 110 of them, including 19 newly elected representatives. In the Senate, there are 39, including four who have been elected since 2020.  We can expect them to do everything they can in the 118th Congress to undermine any efforts to address the climate crisis that none of them publicly says is a crisis. (An updated roster of all 149 has been compiled below.)

It would be bad enough if all these lawmakers were merely fools. However, most of them know climatologists’ warnings aren’t fake news. This doesn’t stop them from continuing to regurgitate debunked propaganda that the fossil fuel industry has for four decades been paying shills to disinform the public about. Nor does it spur them to take legislative action to address what scientists say we must. They don’t care. And if fattening their wallet accompanies their not caring, so much the better.

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