Guest Column by Ray Seidler and Alan Journet in Medford Mail Tribune /  Ashland Daily Tidings, January 24 2021

Note that ‘ACO’ in the penultimate paragraph should be ‘ACI.’

Residents of Bear Creek Valley living through the disastrous fires last September know the threat that global warming poses. Rural Oregonians know we are on the front lines — none more so than we Southern Oregonians.

We know the temperature is rising and rainfall is declining during summer, and that snowpack is declining during winter. We know these trends are drying soils and vegetation through summer and thereby increasing fire risk because we have suffered from, and constantly live with, that risk. Climate changes impact what grows in our forests, what and how we grow our food, and where and how we recreate. With three devastating hurricanes, extreme wildfires, hail, flooding, tornadoes and drought, the United States tallied a record high bill in 2020 for weather-related disasters of $306 billion.

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Abbreviated version appearing in the Bend Bulletin:

Oregonians living through last September’s fires know the threat global warming poses; we are on the frontlines. We know temperature is rising and rainfall is declining during summer, while snowpack is declining during winter. We know our soils and vegetation are drying through summer and increasing fire risk because we constantly live with that risk. Climate changes impact what grows in our forests, what and how we grow our food, and how we recreate. The cost of weather-related disasters in the United States in 2020 including three devastating hurricanes, extreme wildfires, hail, flooding, tornadoes and drought, reached $306 billion.  We also understand that increasing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations resulting from our behavior will make unchecked global warming worse.

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